oil of the month – cinnamon bark

This oil is among the most antiseptic of essential oils.  It has been produced in Sri Lanka for over 2,000 years!

Extraction method/ Origin :- Steam distillation from the bark – Sri Lanka, India and Madagascar.

Historical uses :- this is the most ancient of spices and was included in just about every prescription issued in ancient China.  It was regarded as a tranquilizer, tonic for the stomach and as being good for depression and a weak heart.

Modern day uses discuss the use of cinnamon as an effective blood sugar stabalizer  for those dealing with type 2 diabetes.

This oils fights viral and infectious diseases, and testing has yet to find a virus, bacteria or fungus that can survive in its presence – it is why I chose this oil to add to my home -made Elderberry Syrup- recipe in “Health related articles”

 

It is a very hot oil so caution must be taken when applying to the skin or ingesting it – a little goes a long way.  It is generally regarded as safe and approved as a food additive by the FDA.  Dilute 1 drop oil is 2 teasp honey or 8oz beverage (rice milk or milk/water).  You may need to increase the dilution even more due to this oil’s potential for irritating mucus membranes.

When applying to the skin it is best to dilute with a carrier oil or use layering technique :-  With clients  I sometimes will add 1 drop of cinnamon and 1 drop of peppermint to the area of concern – usually a trigger point around the shoulder area or insertion of the Levator Scapula –  massage in and mix carrier oil as needed – this oil has a high phenol count which is why it can seem sensitive to the skin- so ensure a carrier oils is readily available if needed.With the cinnamon being a hot oil and the peppermint being a cooler oil it produces a warm/cold effect when applied to the skin.

 

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