Archive for the ‘FYI – Massage Therapists’ Category

Oil of the month – Eucalyptus globolus

Wednesday, November 20th, 2013

With the sniffles and sneezes coming around the corner I always ensure that I have some Eucalyptus on hand at home or the office.

Gentle enough to use on my 2 young children yet strong enough to be effective for my clients with respiratory issues.

Extraction method/origin:- Steam distilled from the leaves/ Australia and Brazil

Historical uses :- Australian aborigines used the eucalyptus leaves to bind up serious wounds.  This would not only prevent infection but also expedite healing.

Modern uses primarily to affect the Respiratory System.

A couple drops in the bath or shower to produce a moist inhalation for sinus issues/colds.

When my young children get colds I always apply eucalyptus with a carrier oil on their chests at night.  Also apply to the bottom of feet then apply a thick base cream and put on a thick pair of   wool socks – as the feet keep warm at night the oils will continue to be absorbed and effect the respiratory system.

With clients it is usually one of the oils of choice when respiratory issues or sinus infections come visiting the office! Applying along each side of the neck and around the ears, along the clavicle – I then create and infusion chamber with the sheet by bringing  it  up and over their heads and have them breathe normally for  a few minutes.

 

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oil of the month – cinnamon bark

Sunday, October 20th, 2013

This oil is among the most antiseptic of essential oils.  It has been produced in Sri Lanka for over 2,000 years!

Extraction method/ Origin :- Steam distillation from the bark – Sri Lanka, India and Madagascar.

Historical uses :- this is the most ancient of spices and was included in just about every prescription issued in ancient China.  It was regarded as a tranquilizer, tonic for the stomach and as being good for depression and a weak heart.

Modern day uses discuss the use of cinnamon as an effective blood sugar stabalizer  for those dealing with type 2 diabetes.

This oils fights viral and infectious diseases, and testing has yet to find a virus, bacteria or fungus that can survive in its presence – it is why I chose this oil to add to my home -made Elderberry Syrup- recipe in “Health related articles”

 

It is a very hot oil so caution must be taken when applying to the skin or ingesting it – a little goes a long way.  It is generally regarded as safe and approved as a food additive by the FDA.  Dilute 1 drop oil is 2 teasp honey or 8oz beverage (rice milk or milk/water).  You may need to increase the dilution even more due to this oil’s potential for irritating mucus membranes.

When applying to the skin it is best to dilute with a carrier oil or use layering technique :-  With clients  I sometimes will add 1 drop of cinnamon and 1 drop of peppermint to the area of concern – usually a trigger point around the shoulder area or insertion of the Levator Scapula –  massage in and mix carrier oil as needed – this oil has a high phenol count which is why it can seem sensitive to the skin- so ensure a carrier oils is readily available if needed.With the cinnamon being a hot oil and the peppermint being a cooler oil it produces a warm/cold effect when applied to the skin.

 

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Oil of the month – Marjorum

Friday, September 6th, 2013

Marjorum was known as the “herb of happiness” to the Romans and “joy of the mountains” to the Greeks.  It was believed to increase longevity. I usually use this oil daily with my clients, not with my prenatal massage clients though.   It works wonderfully with Basil on contracted muscles or active spasms – I often use a hot moist pack on top of layering the oils as this oil is known as a warm oil and will comfortably warm the area that it is applied to.

Extraction Method/Origin ; Steam distilled from the leaves/ France

Medical Properties; Antibacterial, antifungal, lowers blood pressure, promotes intestinal peristalsis, expectorant.

For info on quality oils – have a look at Young Livings website – a wealth of information

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Pregnancy support

Tuesday, August 27th, 2013

Proud to be a member of the American Pregnancy Association (APA) – promoting reproductive and pregnancy wellness

americanpregnancylogo

This is a wonderful resource to have, for couples trying to conceive, expecting parents and prenatal Massage Therapists,  please visit their site.

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Oil of the month – Lavendar

Wednesday, July 24th, 2013

Lavendar is a universal oil that has traditionally been know to balance the body and to work wherever there is a need.  If in doubt, use Lavendar. Its a wonderful calming oil and like peppermint is one I usually use on most clients.

Great for headaches when used is specific spots on the body.  Gently eliminates a  headache that a client may come in with in 99.9% of cases!

Safe to use during pregancy, may help calm nerves or emotions for mom – to -be, and help with sleep disturbances.

EXTRACTION METHOD/ORIGIN   –  Steam distilled from flowering tip – France, Idaho, Utah.

PROPERTIES ; Analgesic, Anti-coagulant, anti-depressant, anti-fungal, sedative, skin regenerative, ant-inflammatory.

One of my fellow therapists mentioned that she puts a drop of lavendar in her mascara bottle to thin it out and get more shine from eye lashes.

I do not use mascara so cannot say either way , if you do  give it a try !

MY FAVORITE USES

Aside from always having a bottle at the office I also do at home.   Using it neat on cuts, burns and scrapes, it can help to dissinfect a sore area, and speed the healing process on burns.  Also great for stopping bleeding on major cuts – I cut my thumb badly headed straight for Lavendar and was amazed at how instantly the throbbing and bleeding stopped – I went on to have 7 stitches and did not need to take any of the pain killers as I just applied Lavendar every time it started throbbing.

NOTE:  Lavendar oil is one of the oils that is adultarated the most often with a cheaper hybrid called lavendin – it smells just like lavendar and is hard to tell apart with smell alone.    The chemical constituant of Lavendin is very different though – I would not advise putting Lavendar oil directly on a cut or burn unless you KNOW it is pure Lavendar oil – otherwise it will burn.

For the purest of oils please visit www.youngliving.org/mymassage – click “about Young Living” tab for a wealth of information

 

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Oil of the month – Peppermint

Monday, June 24th, 2013

Peppermint is one of my favorites to use in my office with my massage clients. I dont use it on my pregnant clients but save it if I perform an induction massage with them.  It is a cool, invigorating oil.   A must for home and office.

EXTRACTION METHOD/ORIGIN     – Steam distilled from leaves, stems, and flower buds        –         North America

PROPERTIES    – Great as an analgesic (pain relief), anti-inflammatory, antiseptic, antispasmodic .

HISTORICAL USES -For centuries, peppermint has been used to soothe digestive difficulties, freshen breath, relieve colic, gas, headaches, heartburn and indigestion

MY FAVORITE USES  FOR PEPPERMINT;   I use it daily with most clients, giving a wonderful cooling effect wonderful for tight neck and upper back, I use at the end of the session so clients dont feel cold during the session.

I put a few drops on some toilet paper and dangle it from  the face rest, when clients lie face down it helps to keep their sinses open.

When painting, peppermint is my favorite oil to use in the paint.  It effectively removes paint fumes and after smell.  Add one teasp of pure essential oil to one gallon of paint – stir vigorously and apply paint.  ( I sometimes take my oil to the paint store and add it to the gallon before they put it in the machine to mix it up – that way its all ready once you get home!)

I only use Young Living Essential Oils – they are the only company in this country that I am aware  of that uses the AFNOR European standard of quality for all of their oils.  The have their own organic farms throughout the US, France, Ecuador and Oman.

To learn more about Essential Oils  click on  “about YoungLiving” tab  it will give you a wealth of information about the use of essential oils.

Any questions about peppermint?   Please ask !

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